Showing 25 - 36 of 83 publications
August 2020

Building a Social Contract? Understanding Tax Morale in Nigeria

by Neil McCulloch, Tom Moerenhout & Joonseok Yang

An important part of every country’s development process is the building of a social contract in which citizens pay tax and, in turn, receive public goods and services. Evidence suggests that this is associated with the establishment of a norm of tax payment and a belief that non-payment is wrong. We exploit a new, nationally…

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July 2020

How Can Governments of Low-Income Countries Collect More Tax Revenue?

by Mick Moore & Wilson Prichard

In this chapter, Moore and Prichard provide two different kinds of answers to the question of how governments of developing countries can increase tax revenues. First, they discuss seven potential revenue sources that governments of developing countries tend to use less than they should. Mining, tobacco and alcohol, the incomes and wealth of rich people,…

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April 2020

The International Political Economy of Global Tax Governance

by Martin Hearson

Taxation binds the state together with its citizens, and with other economic actors operating within its borders. The growth of cross-border capital flows and global corporations has complicated these taxing relationships, creating opportunities for competition and cooperation between states. ‘Double taxation’ occurs when two or more states disagree over who has the right to tax…

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March 2020

Mining Taxation in Africa: What Recent Evolution in 2018?

by Yannick Bouterige, Céline de Quatrebarbes & Bertrand Laporte

The extractive sector is of primary importance to African states. Of the 54 countries on the continent, 20 are considered by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to be rich in natural resources. These are countries whose natural resources account for more than 25 per cent of total exports. All are sub-Saharan African countries: seven export…

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Fuel Subsidy Reform and the Social Contract in Nigeria: a Micro-economic Analysis

by Neil McCulloch, Tom Moerenhout & Joonseok Yang

Fuel subsidies in Nigeria are enormous. At last estimate, the state subsidises gasoline to the tune of USD 3.9 billion — almost double the entire health budget. Subsidies exist because the government fixes the price of gasoline for consumers below the international price and uses government resources to pay for the difference. They were first…

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January 2020

Fuel Subsidy Reform and the Social Contract in Nigeria: a Micro-economic Analysis

by Neil McCulloch, Tom Moerenhout & Joonseok Yang

Fuel subsidies in Nigeria are enormous. At last estimate, the state subsidises petrol to the tune of US$3.9 billion – almost double the entire health budget. Such subsidies come at great cost: the opportunity costs of such spending on other development objectives are large; the distribution of resources to the state governments is reduced; the…

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December 2019

Democratisation in Tanzania: No Elections Without Tax Exemptions

by Ole Therkildsen & Dr Ane Karoline Bak

A demand-supply framework has been developed and applied to Tanzania to explore the link between democratisation, economic liberalisation and the use of tax exemptions to fund political parties’ electoral campaigns. In Tanzania, the demand for this type of money has increased since one-party rule was abolished in 1992. This led to reduced state subsidies to…

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October 2019

What are ‘Tax Expenditures’ and How Big are Energy-Related Tax Expenditures?

by Roel Dom & Neil McCulloch

Tax expenditures occur when a government provides a reduction in a tax obligation such that it collects less tax than it would have otherwise collected. Tax expenditures are an integral, though controversial, part of all contemporary tax systems. This policy briefing first summarises the various ways in which tax expenditures can be defined and measured….

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Nigeria: No longer an oil state?

by Sarah Burns & Olly Owen

While there is much speculation about Nigeria’s probably post-oil future, it is in fact already a present reality: In 2015, for the first time since 1971, Nigeria’s public finances had already earned more from non-oil sources than from oil revenues. The transformation to a post-oil future is already in the past.

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June 2019

Democratisation in Tanzania: No Elections Without Tax Exemptions

by Ole Therkildsen & Dr Ane Karoline Bak

A demand-supply framework has been developed and applied to Tanzania to explore the link between democratisation, economic liberalisation and the use of tax exemptions to fund political parties’ electoral campaigns. In Tanzania, the demand for this type of money has increased since one-party rule was abolished in 1992. This led to reduced state subsidies to…

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April 2019

Colonial Legacy, State-building and the Salience of Ethnicity in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Merima Ali, Odd-Helge Fjeldstad, Boqian Jiang & Abdulaziz B Shifa

African colonial history suggests that British colonial rule may have undermined state centralisation due to legacies of ethnic segregation and stronger executive constraints. Using micro-data from anglophone and francophone countries in sub-Saharan Africa, we find that anglophone citizens are less likely to identify themselves in national terms (relative to ethnic terms). To address endogeneity concerns,…

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